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KUKA.OfficeLite: A Powerful and Versatile Software Solution for KUKA Robots




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KUKA.OfficeLite: The Virtual Robot Controller from KUKA




If you are looking for a way to program and simulate KUKA robots offline on your PC, you might be interested in KUKA.OfficeLite. This software solution is a virtual robot controller that mimics the features and functions of the real KUKA System Software. In this article, you will learn what KUKA.OfficeLite is, what it can do, how to install it, how to use it, how to transfer programs from it to the robot controller, how to connect it with other software solutions, what are its advantages, what are its alternatives, and some frequently asked questions about it.




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What is KUKA.OfficeLite and what can it do?




KUKA.OfficeLite is a software solution that allows you to create and optimize programs offline on any PC. It is nearly identical to the KUKA System Software for the KR C4 and KR C5 robot controllers. It uses KUKA.OfficeLite is a software solution that allows you to create and optimize programs offline on any PC. It is nearly identical to the KUKA System Software for the KR C4 and KR C5 robot controllers. It uses the original KUKA SmartHMI and KRL syntax, so offline operation and programming correspond exactly to those of the robot. The programming system has the same characteristics as the KUKA System Software, such as:


  • Each KUKA System Software release is available in full with all of the functions (a hardware periphery connection is not possible)



  • KRL syntax check by the compiler and interpreter provided



  • Executable KRL application programs can be created



  • Sequence control of robot application programs in real time: improved cycle times



  • Programs can be optimized on a standard PC at any time and on a regular basis



  • Digital input signals can be simulated to test signal polling in the KRL program



With KUKA.OfficeLite, you can practice handling the KUKA System Software on a PC without needing a real robot. You can also develop and test robot applications offline and transfer them to the robot controller later. Moreover, you can use KUKA.OfficeLite in conjunction with other software solutions, such as KUKA.Sim, RoboDK, OrangeEdit, etc. Now that you know what KUKA.OfficeLite is and what it can do, you might be wondering how to install it on your PC. In this section, I will show you how to download and set up KUKA.OfficeLite using Hyper-V, a virtualization technology from Microsoft.


How to install KUKA.OfficeLite on your PC




To install KUKA.OfficeLite on your PC, you will need the following requirements:


  • A PC with Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise edition (64-bit)



  • A minimum of 8 GB of RAM and 50 GB of free disk space



  • A processor that supports virtualization (Intel VT-x or AMD-V)



  • A license for KUKA.OfficeLite (you can request a free trial license from KUKA)



  • A download link for the KUKA.OfficeLite image file (you will receive it after requesting the license)



  • Hyper-V enabled on your PC (you can check and enable it from the Windows Features dialog box)



Once you have all the requirements, you can follow these steps to install KUKA.OfficeLite on your PC:


  • Download the KUKA.OfficeLite image file from the link provided by KUKA. The file size is about 25 GB, so it might take some time to download.



  • Extract the image file to a folder on your PC. You should see a file with the extension .vhdx, which is the virtual hard disk file for KUKA.OfficeLite.



  • Open Hyper-V Manager from the Start menu or the Control Panel. If you don't see it, make sure you have enabled Hyper-V on your PC.



  • In Hyper-V Manager, click on Action > New > Virtual Machine to create a new virtual machine for KUKA.OfficeLite.



  • In the New Virtual Machine Wizard, click Next and enter a name for the virtual machine, such as KUKA.OfficeLite. Choose a location to store the virtual machine files and click Next.



  • Select Generation 1 as the generation of the virtual machine and click Next.



  • Assign at least 4 GB of memory to the virtual machine and click Next.



  • Select Default Switch as the network connection for the virtual machine and click Next.



  • Select Use an existing virtual hard disk as the option for the hard disk and browse to the folder where you extracted the image file. Select the .vhdx file and click Next.



  • Review the summary of the virtual machine settings and click Finish to create the virtual machine.



  • In Hyper-V Manager, right-click on the virtual machine you created and select Settings. In the settings window, go to Processor and increase the number of virtual processors to at least 2. Click OK to save the changes.



  • Right-click on the virtual machine again and select Connect. This will open a window that shows the virtual machine screen.



  • In the virtual machine window, click on Start to power on the virtual machine. You should see a message that says "Starting Windows". Wait for a few minutes until Windows loads.



  • When Windows loads, you should see a login screen with a user name "KukaUser" and a password "Kuka". Enter these credentials and press Enter to log in.



  • After logging in, you should see a desktop with a shortcut icon for KUKA.OfficeLite. Double-click on this icon to launch KUKA.OfficeLite.



  • You should see a splash screen that says "KUKA Office Lite". Wait for a few seconds until it disappears and then you should see the main window of KUKA.OfficeLite with the SmartHMI interface.



Congratulations! You have successfully installed KUKA.OfficeLite on your PC using Hyper-V. You can now start using it for offline programming and simulation of KUKA robots.


Now that you have installed KUKA.OfficeLite on your PC, you might be wondering how to use it for offline programming and application development. In this section, I will show you how to use some of the main functions and tools of KUKA.OfficeLite, such as KRL syntax, sequence control, digital input simulation, etc.


How to use KUKA.OfficeLite for offline programming and application development




KUKA.OfficeLite is designed to be as close as possible to the real KUKA System Software, so you can use it in the same way as you would use the robot controller. You can access the SmartHMI interface, which is the graphical user interface for operating and programming the robot. You can also access the KRL editor, which is the text editor for writing and editing KRL code. KRL stands for KUKA Robot Language, which is the programming language for KUKA robots.


To use KUKA.OfficeLite for offline programming and application development, you can follow these steps:


  • In the virtual machine window, double-click on the KUKA.OfficeLite icon to launch it. You should see the SmartHMI interface with a menu bar and a toolbar at the top, a status bar at the bottom, and a main area in the middle.



  • In the menu bar, click on File > Open Project to open an existing project or File > New Project to create a new project. A project is a collection of files and folders that belong to a specific robot application. You can also use the toolbar buttons or the keyboard shortcuts to perform these actions.



  • In the main area, you should see a tree view of the project structure on the left and a tabbed view of the project files on the right. You can expand or collapse the tree view nodes to see the different folders and files in the project. You can also switch between different tabs to see different files in the project.



  • To create or edit a KRL program file, you can right-click on the SRC folder in the tree view and select New > Program or double-click on an existing program file in the tree view or the tabbed view. This will open the KRL editor, where you can write or modify KRL code.



  • The KRL editor has a syntax highlighting feature that helps you identify different elements of the code, such as keywords, variables, comments, etc. It also has a syntax check feature that helps you detect and correct errors in the code. You can use the toolbar buttons or the keyboard shortcuts to perform these actions.



  • To run or debug a KRL program file, you can right-click on it in the tree view or the tabbed view and select Run or Debug. This will open the sequence control window, where you can control and monitor the execution of the program. You can also use the toolbar buttons or the keyboard shortcuts to perform these actions.



  • The sequence control window has a toolbar at the top and a status area at the bottom. The toolbar has buttons for starting, stopping, pausing, resuming, stepping, and resetting the program execution. The status area shows information such as current line number, current instruction, current mode, current state, etc.



  • To simulate digital input signals for testing purposes, you can click on Tools > Digital Input Simulation in the menu bar or the toolbar. This will open the digital input simulation window, where you can set or reset the values of the digital input signals. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts to perform these actions.



  • To view or change the robot configuration, you can click on Tools > Robot Configuration in the menu bar or the toolbar. This will open the robot configuration window, where you can see and modify the parameters of the robot, such as kinematics, limits, offsets, etc.



  • To view or change the project settings, you can click on Project > Project Settings in the menu bar or the toolbar. This will open the project settings window, where you can see and modify the settings of the project, such as name, description, version, etc.



These are some of the basic functions and tools of KUKA.OfficeLite that you can use for offline programming and application development. You can also explore other features and options of KUKA.OfficeLite by using the menu bar, the toolbar, or the context menus. You can also refer to the online help or the user manual for more information and guidance.


Now that you know how to use KUKA.OfficeLite for offline programming and application development, you might be wondering how to transfer programs from KUKA.OfficeLite to the robot controller. In this section, I will show you how to export and import programs between KUKA.OfficeLite and the real robot controller using KUKA.WorkVisual, a software solution that enables the configuration and commissioning of KUKA robots.


How to transfer programs from KUKA.OfficeLite to the robot controller




To transfer programs from KUKA.OfficeLite to the robot controller, you will need the following requirements:


  • A PC with Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise edition (64-bit) and Hyper-V enabled



  • A virtual machine with KUKA.OfficeLite installed and running on the PC



  • A license for KUKA.WorkVisual (you can request a free trial license from KUKA)



  • A download link for the KUKA.WorkVisual installation file (you will receive it after requesting the license)



  • A real robot controller with the same version of KUKA System Software as KUKA.OfficeLite



  • A network connection between the PC and the robot controller (either via Ethernet cable or wireless)



Once you have all the requirements, you can follow these steps to transfer programs from KUKA.OfficeLite to the robot controller:


  • Download the KUKA.WorkVisual installation file from the link provided by KUKA. The file size is about 1.5 GB, so it might take some time to download.



  • Run the installation file and follow the instructions to install KUKA.WorkVisual on your PC. You will need to enter the license key that you received from KUKA during the installation process.



  • Open KUKA.WorkVisual from the Start menu or the desktop shortcut. You should see a welcome screen with a menu bar and a toolbar at the top, a project explorer on the left, and a work area on the right.



  • In the menu bar, click on File > New > Project to create a new project or File > Open > Project to open an existing project. A project is a collection of files and folders that contain the configuration and commissioning data for one or more robot controllers. You can also use the toolbar buttons or the keyboard shortcuts to perform these actions.



  • In the project explorer, you should see a tree view of the project structure on the left and a tabbed view of the project files on the right. You can expand or collapse the tree view nodes to see the different folders and files in the project. You can also switch between different tabs to see different files in the project.



  • To add a new robot controller to the project, you can right-click on Controllers in the tree view and select Add Controller. This will open a dialog box where you can enter the name, type, and version of the robot controller. You can also select an existing controller from a list of available controllers.



  • To connect to a real robot controller via network, you can right-click on it in the tree view and select Connect. This will open a dialog box where you can enter the IP address, port number, and password of the robot controller. You can also select an existing connection from a list of available connections.



  • Once you are connected to the robot controller, you can see its status and configuration in the project explorer and the work area. You can also perform various actions on the robot controller, such as reading, writing, synchronizing, updating, etc.



  • To export a program from KUKA.OfficeLite to KUKA.WorkVisual, you can switch to the virtual machine window and open KUKA.OfficeLite. In KUKA.OfficeLite, you can right-click on the program file that you want to export in the tree view or the tabbed view and select Export. This will open a dialog box where you can choose a location and a name for the exported file. The file will have the extension .src, which is the source code file for KRL programs.



  • To import a program from KUKA.WorkVisual to KUKA.OfficeLite, you can switch to the KUKA.WorkVisual window and open KUKA.WorkVisual. In KUKA.WorkVisual, you can right-click on the robot controller that you want to import the program to in the project explorer and select Import > Program. This will open a dialog box where you can browse to the location of the exported file and select it. The file will be imported to the SRC folder of the robot controller in the project.



  • To transfer a program from KUKA.WorkVisual to the real robot controller, you can right-click on the program file that you want to transfer in the project explorer or the work area and select Write. This will write the program file to the memory of the robot controller. You can also use the toolbar buttons or the keyboard shortcuts to perform this action.



  • To transfer a program from the real robot controller to KUKA.WorkVisual, you can right-click on the SRC folder of the robot controller in the project explorer or the work area and select Read. This will read all the program files from the memory of the robot controller and import them to the SRC folder of the robot controller in the project. You can also use the toolbar buttons or the keyboard shortcuts to perform this action.



These are some of the basic steps to transfer programs from KUKA.OfficeLite to the robot controller using KUKA.WorkVisual. You can also explore other features and options of KUKA.WorkVisual by using the menu bar, the toolbar, or the context menus. You can also refer to the online help or the user manual for more information and guidance.


How to connect KUKA.OfficeLite with other software solutions




KUKA.OfficeLite is not only a standalone software solution, but also a compatible and integrable software solution. You can use KUKA.OfficeLite in conjunction with other software solutions that can enhance your offline programming and simulation experience. In this section, I will show you how to use KUKA.OfficeLite with some of the most popular software solutions, such as KUKA.Sim, RoboDK, OrangeEdit, etc.


  • KUKA.Sim: KUKA.Sim is a software solution that focuses on physical simulation and visualization of robot motion. It allows you to create realistic 3D models of your robot cells and environments, and simulate the robot behavior and performance in different scenarios. You can use KUKA.Sim to design, optimize, and validate your robot applications before implementing them on the real robot. You can also use KUKA.Sim to generate KRL code automatically from your simulation models, and transfer it to KUKA.OfficeLite for further editing and testing. To use KUKA.Sim with KUKA.OfficeLite, you will need to install both software solutions on your PC, and connect them via network. You can then use the Export/Import functions in KUKA.Sim and KUKA.OfficeLite to exchange programs between them.



  • RoboDK: RoboDK is a software solution that supports multiple robot brands and offers CAD/CAM integration and path planning. It allows you to import 3D models of your robot cells and environments from various CAD formats, and program your robot using a graphical interface or a Python API. You can use RoboDK to create complex robot trajectories and motions, and optimize them for speed, accuracy, and collision avoidance. You can also use RoboDK to generate KRL code automatically from your robot programs, and transfer it to KUKA.OfficeLite for further editing and testing. To use RoboDK with KUKA.OfficeLite, you will need to install both software solutions on your PC, and connect them via network. You can then use the Post Processor functions in RoboDK and KUKA.OfficeLite to exchange programs between them.



  • OrangeEdit: OrangeEdit is a software solution that provides a simple and intuitive editor for KRL code. It allows you to write, edit, debug, and compile KRL code on any PC, without needing a real robot or a virtual controller. You can use OrangeEdit to create and modify KRL programs offline, and check them for syntax errors and warnings. You can also use OrangeEdit to export and import programs between different versions of KUKA System Software or different robot models. To use OrangeEdit with KUKA.OfficeLite, you will need to install both software solutions on your PC, and connect them via network. You can then use the File Transfer functions in OrangeEdit and KUKA.OfficeLite to exchange programs between them.



These are some of the software solutions that you can use with KUKA.OfficeLite to enhance your offline programming and simulation experience. You can also explore other software solutions that are compatible or integrable with KUKA.OfficeLite by visiting the official website of KUKA or contacting their support team.


Now that you know how to use KUKA.OfficeLite with other software solutions, you might be wondering what are the advantages of using KUKA.OfficeLite. In this section, I will summarize the main benefits of using KUKA.OfficeLite for different purposes and scenarios.


What are the advantages of using KUKA.OfficeLite?




KUKA.OfficeLite is a powerful and versatile software solution that can offer many advantages for users who want to program and simulate KUKA robots offline on their PC. Some of the main advantages are:


For robotics training and


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