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How Swami Vivekananda Applied the Teachings of the Bhagavad Gita to His Life and Mission: A Free PDF Book


Bhagavad Gita as Viewed by Swami Vivekananda Free PDF




The Bhagavad Gita is one of the most sacred and influential texts in Hinduism. It is a dialogue between Lord Krishna and Arjuna, a warrior prince who faces a moral dilemma before a great battle. The scripture reveals the essence of Hindu philosophy and spirituality, covering topics such as duty, action, devotion, knowledge, meditation, ethics, freedom and liberation.




bhagavad gita as viewed by swami vivekananda free pdf


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Swami Vivekananda was one of the most prominent and respected Hindu monks and spiritual leaders in modern history. He was a disciple of Ramakrishna Paramahamsa, a mystic and saint who taught him the harmony of all religions. He traveled extensively across India and abroad, spreading his message of universal brotherhood, human dignity, social service and spiritual awakening. He was also a great scholar and interpreter of Hindu scriptures, especially the Bhagavad Gita.


In this article, we will explore how Swami Vivekananda viewed and explained the Bhagavad Gita, what he learned from it, how he applied it to his own life and mission, and how we can benefit from his insights today. We will also provide you with some sources where you can find a free PDF of his works on the Bhagavad Gita.


What is the Bhagavad Gita?




The Bhagavad Gita, which means "The Song of God", is a part of the epic Mahabharata, written by Vyasa. It consists of 18 chapters and 700 verses, divided into three sections: Karma Yoga (the yoga of action), Bhakti Yoga (the yoga of devotion) and Jnana Yoga (the yoga of knowledge). It is set in the Kurukshetra battlefield, where two groups of cousins, the Pandavas and the Kauravas, are about to fight for the throne.


Arjuna, the leader of the Pandavas, is overwhelmed by grief and confusion when he sees his relatives, friends and teachers on the opposite side. He feels that killing them would be a sin and a violation of his duty. He turns to his charioteer and friend, Lord Krishna, who is none other than the Supreme God in human form, for guidance and advice. Krishna reveals to him his true identity and teaches him the highest wisdom of life.


The Bhagavad Gita is a dialogue between Krishna and Arjuna, where Krishna answers Arjuna's questions and doubts, clears his misconceptions, and motivates him to perform his duty with detachment and dedication. He also reveals to him the various paths of yoga, the nature of the self, the supreme reality, the law of karma, the cycle of birth and death, and the way to attain liberation.


The Bhagavad Gita is considered to be the essence of Hindu philosophy and spirituality, as it synthesizes the teachings of the Vedas, the Upanishads, and other scriptures. It is also a universal scripture, as it appeals to people of all faiths, cultures and backgrounds. It is a source of inspiration, guidance and solace for millions of people around the world.


Who was Swami Vivekananda?




Swami Vivekananda was born as Narendranath Datta on January 12, 1863, in Kolkata, India. He was a brilliant student and a voracious reader, who excelled in various subjects such as philosophy, literature, history, science and music. He was also interested in spirituality and religion, and explored various paths and traditions. He was especially attracted to the teachings of Vedanta, the philosophy of the Upanishads.


In 1881, he met Ramakrishna Paramahamsa, a mystic and saint who lived in Dakshineswar near Kolkata. Ramakrishna was an embodiment of love, compassion and devotion. He had realized God through various paths and forms, and taught that all religions are true and lead to the same goal. He accepted Narendranath as his disciple and trained him in various disciplines of yoga.


After Ramakrishna's death in 1886, Narendranath took monastic vows and became Swami Vivekananda. He along with his brother monks formed the Ramakrishna Math and Mission, a spiritual and humanitarian organization based on Ramakrishna's ideals. He traveled across India as a wandering monk, serving the poor and needy, uplifting the masses, reviving the ancient culture and heritage, and spreading the message of Vedanta.


In 1893, he represented Hinduism at the Parliament of Religions in Chicago, USA. He delivered a historic speech that electrified the audience and won him worldwide fame and admiration. He became a global ambassador of Hinduism and India. He traveled extensively across America and Europe, giving lectures, holding classes, writing books and articles, establishing centers and inspiring people from all walks of life.


He returned to India in 1897 and continued his work of spiritual and social reform. He founded the Ramakrishna Mission in Belur Math near Kolkata as the headquarters of his organization. He also visited other parts of India such as Kashmir, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. He inspired many eminent personalities such as Mahatma Gandhi, Rabindranath Tagore, Subhash Chandra Bose, Jamshedji Tata, Sister Nivedita, and others.


He passed away on July 4th 1902 at Belur Math at the age of 39. He left behind a rich legacy of writings and speeches on various topics such as religion, philosophy, culture, education, science, social service, and nationalism. He is regarded as one of the greatest sons of India and one of the most influential thinkers and leaders of modern times.


How did Swami Vivekananda interpret the Bhagavad Gita?




Swami Vivekananda was an avid student and admirer of the Bhagavad Gita. He considered it to be one of the most important and practical scriptures of Hinduism. He studied it deeply and commented on it extensively in his writings and speeches. He also applied its teachings to his own life and mission.


Swami Vivekananda interpreted the Bhagavad Gita in a rational, universal, and dynamic way. He emphasized its relevance and applicability to all people, regardless of their caste, creed, or status. He also highlighted its harmony and synthesis of various paths and aspects of yoga.


```html the Bhagavad Gita in terms of four main paths of yoga: Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Jnana Yoga and Raja Yoga. He showed how each path is suitable for different types of people and how they can be combined and balanced for optimal results. He also showed how each path leads to the same goal of self-realization and God-realization. Karma Yoga




Karma Yoga is the path of action and selfless service. It is based on the principle of performing one's duty without attachment to the results. It is suitable for those who are active and dynamic in nature and who want to contribute to the welfare of society.


Swami Vivekananda was a great exponent and practitioner of Karma Yoga. He taught that work is worship and service is the highest form of religion. He urged people to dedicate their lives to the service of humanity, especially the poor and oppressed. He said that by serving others, one serves God and purifies one's mind.


He also taught that Karma Yoga is not only about external actions, but also about internal attitudes. He said that one should perform one's duty with love, enthusiasm, concentration and devotion. He said that one should not be attached to the fruits of one's actions, but should offer them to God or to the supreme cause. He said that one should not be affected by success or failure, praise or blame, but should remain calm and balanced in all situations.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"To work you have the right, but not to the fruits thereof. Let not the fruits of action be your motive; nor let your attachment be to inaction."


"He who sees inaction in action, and action in inaction, he is wise among men; he is a yogi and a doer of all actions."


"Whatever you do, whatever you eat, whatever you offer in sacrifice, whatever you give away, whatever you practice as austerity, O son of Kunti, do it as an offering unto Me."


Bhakti Yoga




Bhakti Yoga is the path of devotion and love. It is based on the principle of surrendering oneself to God or to one's chosen ideal. It is suitable for those who are emotional and sentimental in nature and who want to express their feelings and emotions.


Swami Vivekananda was a great lover and follower of Bhakti Yoga. He had a deep and intense devotion to his guru Ramakrishna Paramahamsa, whom he considered to be an incarnation of God. He also had a profound love for his motherland India and for all living beings. He said that love is the highest power and the greatest force in the universe.


He also taught that Bhakti Yoga is not only about external rituals, but also about internal states. He said that one should cultivate a pure and sincere heart that is free from selfishness, hatred and jealousy. He said that one should develop a personal relationship with God or with one's chosen ideal that is based on trust, faith and loyalty. He said that one should worship God or one's chosen ideal with various moods such as friendship, servitude, parenthood or conjugal love.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"Whosoever comes to Me through whatsoever form, I reach him; all men are struggling through paths which in the end lead to Me."


"Fix your mind on Me; be devoted to Me; sacrifice to Me; bow down to Me; having thus united your whole self with Me; taking Me as your supreme goal; you shall come to Me."


"I am the Self seated in the heart of all beings; I am the beginning, the middle and also the end of all beings."


Jnana Yoga




```html the truth of existence.


Swami Vivekananda was a great master and teacher of Jnana Yoga. He had a sharp and clear intellect that could grasp the essence of any subject. He was well-versed in various branches of knowledge such as philosophy, science, psychology, history and culture. He was also a great exponent of Vedanta, the philosophy of the Upanishads, which is the highest form of Jnana Yoga.


He also taught that Jnana Yoga is not only about external information, but also about internal realization. He said that one should use one's reason and logic to analyze and question everything, but also to go beyond them and experience the reality directly. He said that one should realize one's true nature as the Atman, the immortal and blissful self that is identical with Brahman, the supreme reality. He said that one should overcome one's ignorance and attachment that cause suffering and bondage.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"This Self cannot be cut, burnt, wetted or dried up; it is eternal, all-pervading, stable, ancient and immovable."


"As a man casts off his worn-out clothes and takes up new ones, so does the embodied Self cast off its worn-out bodies and enter others that are new."


"He who sees Me in everything and everything in Me; he never loses sight of Me nor do I ever lose sight of him."


Raja Yoga




Raja Yoga is the path of meditation and concentration. It is based on the principle of controlling and transcending one's mind and senses. It is suitable for those who are calm and focused in nature and who want to achieve inner peace and harmony.


Swami Vivekananda was a great adept and pioneer of Raja Yoga. He had a powerful and serene mind that could enter into deep states of meditation and samadhi. He was well-acquainted with various methods and techniques of meditation such as pranayama, pratyahara, dharana, dhyana and samadhi. He was also a great interpreter of Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, which is the authoritative text on Raja Yoga.


He also taught that Raja Yoga is not only about external practices, but also about internal states. He said that one should train one's mind and senses to be calm, steady and concentrated. He said that one should develop one's will power, concentration power and memory power. He said that one should meditate on one's chosen object or idea or symbol or mantra or sound or form or concept or principle or quality or aspect or attribute or essence or core or center or source or origin or cause or foundation or basis or root or seed or germ or nucleus or soul or spirit or self or God.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"When his mind, intellect and self are under control; freed from restless desire; by renunciation they attain to supreme state of freedom from action."


"As a lamp in a windless place does not flicker; such is the simile thought of for the yogi whose mind is controlled."


"He who has attained to this state is never shaken by any sorrow; this state which is free from pain is called yoga; it has to be attained with firm resolve."


Why is Swami Vivekananda's interpretation relevant today?




```html and practical guide to live a meaningful and fulfilling life. It helps us to face the challenges and opportunities of the modern world with courage and confidence. It inspires us to pursue our goals and dreams with passion and perseverance. It teaches us to balance our personal and professional lives with harmony and efficiency. It enables us to cope with stress and anxiety with calmness and clarity. It empowers us to overcome our weaknesses and limitations with strength and wisdom. It encourages us to serve others with love and compassion. It enlightens us to realize our true potential and purpose with joy and peace.


Swami Vivekananda's interpretation of the Bhagavad Gita is relevant today because it also shows us the universal appeal of the scripture, the practical guidance of the scripture, and the inspirational role model of Swami Vivekananda himself.


The universal appeal of the Bhagavad Gita




The Bhagavad Gita is a universal scripture because it transcends religious boundaries and speaks to all humanity. It does not belong to any particular sect or creed, but to the whole world. It does not impose any dogma or doctrine, but respects all opinions and perspectives. It does not discriminate between any caste or class, but treats all as equal. It does not condemn any path or practice, but supports all that lead to truth.


Swami Vivekananda was a champion of the universal appeal of the Bhagavad Gita. He said that the scripture is not only for Hindus, but for everyone who wants to know the meaning of life. He said that the scripture is not only for saints, but for everyone who wants to be a better human being. He said that the scripture is not only for scholars, but for everyone who wants to learn something new.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"Whosoever knows this secret teaching; without regard for caste, creed, family or lineage; attains the highest goal."


"In whatever way men approach Me; even so do I welcome them; for the path men take from every side is Mine."


"The same am I to all beings; I have no favorites nor enemies; but those who worship Me with love dwell in Me and I in them."


The practical guidance of the Bhagavad Gita




The Bhagavad Gita is a practical scripture because it offers solutions to common problems and dilemmas that we face in our daily lives. It deals with issues such as duty, action, desire, attachment, renunciation, work, ethics, morality, freedom, happiness, sorrow, death, rebirth, etc. It gives us clear and concise advice on how to handle these issues with skill and grace.


Swami Vivekananda was a follower of the practical guidance of the Bhagavad Gita. He said that the scripture is not only for meditation, but for action. He said that the scripture is not only for theory, but for practice. He said that the scripture is not only for contemplation, but for application.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"Perform your obligatory duty; because action is indeed better than inaction."


"The wise man should restrain his senses like a tortoise drawing in its limbs."


"He who has given up attachment; who is free from dualities; who is ever balanced in both success and failure; he is not bound by action."


The inspirational role model of Swami Vivekananda




```html the ideals and values of the Bhagavad Gita in his life and words. He embodies the spirit and essence of the scripture in his personality and character. He demonstrates the harmony and synthesis of the four paths of yoga in his actions and achievements. He radiates the wisdom and power of the scripture in his teachings and influence.


Swami Vivekananda is an inspirational role model because he also inspires us to follow his example and to apply the teachings of the Bhagavad Gita to our own lives. He challenges us to rise above our mediocrity and to strive for excellence. He motivates us to awaken our dormant potential and to manifest our true nature. He guides us to discover our inner voice and to follow our own path.


He quoted the Bhagavad Gita as follows:


"Arise, awake, and stop not till the goal is reached."


"Be fearless and pure; never waver in your determination or your dedication to the spiritual life."


"You are the maker of your own destiny; you have the power within yourself to make yourself great."


Where can you find a free PDF of Swami Vivekananda's interpretation?




If you are interested in reading more about Swami Vivekananda's interpretation of the Bhagavad Gita, you can find a free PDF of his works on the following sources and links:


Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda




This is a comprehensive collection of Swami Vivekananda's writings and speeches in 9 volumes. It covers various topics such as religion, philosophy, culture, education, science, social service, and nationalism. It also contains his commentaries on various scriptures such as the Vedas, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Yoga Sutras, etc.


You can download or read online the Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda from this link: https://advaitaashrama.org/cw/


Lectures on the Bhagavad Gita by Swami Vivekananda




This is a series of talks that Swami Vivekananda delivered on the Bhagavad Gita in various places such as London, New York, San Francisco, etc. He explained the main themes and messages of the scripture in a simple and lucid manner. He also related them to the contemporary issues and challenges that people face in their lives.


You can download or read online the Lectures on the Bhagavad Gita by Swami Vivekananda from this link: https://www.ramakrishnavivekananda.info/vivekananda/volume_4/lectures_on_the_bhagavad_gita.htm


Bhagavad Gita According to Gandhi by Mahatma Gandhi




This is a commentary on the Bhagavad Gita by Mahatma Gandhi, another admirer of Swami Vivekananda. Gandhi was deeply influenced by Swami Vivekananda's interpretation of the scripture, especially on Karma Yoga. He applied its teachings to his own life and mission of non-violence and social justice. He also shared his insights and reflections on the scripture with his followers and friends.


You can download or read online the Bhagavad Gita According to Gandhi by Mahatma Gandhi from this link: https://www.mkgandhi.org/ebks/gita-according-to-gandhi.pdf


Conclusion




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